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10
Apr

By using the help and experience of survivors of domestic abuse Cambridgeshire council has created a lasting shift in community behaviour

Here in Cambridgeshire, we have been using an innovative approach to behaviour change that has achieved a remarkable turnaround in attitudes within the council, the police, and the community towards survivors of domestic violence.

 
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04
Apr

Posted by Craig Brown

Over the years I have seen some tweets and posts with the phrase positive deviance and generally assumed this to mean the variation from normal on the winners side of the bell curve. Yesterday I started reading Rabovich and DeRosa's (Nov 2011) paper "Patterns of Success in Systems Engineering" which prefaces its findings with an explanation of the idea of positive deviance.

While I was on the right track, it turns out that positive deviance has a lot more to it.  Positive deviance has a Wikipedia article where you can read about the concept and where it came from. I want to talk about how it is relevant to me and my job.  A couple of quick ideas for now.  I'll be reading more soon.

 
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20
Feb

In every high school there are students that are practicing behaviors that are keeping them in school.

In every high school there are teachers, administrators, and parents practicing behaviors that are keeping students in school.

The Positive Deviance Approach is a quick, low cost method to identify behaviors and practices that keep students in school and encourages the rest of student community to adopt them

The Positive Deviance Approach has been used successfully in a variety of different venues and conditions.

The potential for the Positive Deviance Approach to reduce high school dropouts is vast and largely untapped

Source : http://www.teacherdrivenchange.org/.

 
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20
Feb

Do you practice Positive Deviance in you school community? Throughout our school communities, there are positive deviants or as Kevin Buck refers to them as Positive Innovators -- individuals whose uncommon behaviors enable them to find better practices to pervasive problems, while sharing the same resource base as other stakeholders within their respective community.

The Positive Deviance Approach allows us to recognize and acknowledge what's working in our school communities by publicizing behavioral strategies that lead to success. By focusing on what works, we can begin to close the achievement gap and increase student retention. One example of the Positive Deviance Approach in schools is in Brazosport, Texas, a district which basically eliminated the achievement gap between racial and socioeconomic groups by tapping the talents of successful teachers and amplifying their strategies around the district. [For a detailed description of Brazosport's methods, see The Results Fieldbook by Mike Schmoker (ASCD, 2001) ]

We need to know the Positive Deviance behaviors and practices that you and your colleagues believe lead to successful school change. Email the IFT about your PD behaviors. How are you using strength-based thinking in the teaching and learning process? What great things are taking place between teachers and parents that are helping students? Email us at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

source : http://www.teacherdrivenchange.org/

 
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